Betty Duffy

(Amateur)

Friday, November 5, 2010

QTs

1.
It's probably too early in the season to have Seasonal Affective Disorder. The sun is still out, of course, it's out there, and I'm in here, and the house is too cold for me to doff my robe and get dressed.

2.
Fortunately, one of the kids barfed last night, which was a good excuse to cancel everything on the docket for today. Hence I'm still scuffing around with a mug of luke-warm coffee, sleep in my eyes, and morning, stretched out, interminable. It's best not to write in this state.

3.
Nevertheless, a Serotonin low, a relatively gray house, the threat of illness, all of it means I'm poised to start writing poetry. Beware.

4.
And so I wrote a few lines incorporating the word "varicella" until one of the kids locked himself in the bathroom with a novel and wouldn't come out when a line formed outside his door, and I had to yell lines with Poop-words in them.

5.
And then the Serotonin Low asked "why?"

6.
Which is dangerous.

7.
Just read about some guy selling his self-published books at local farmer's markets. Is it hopeful or sad?





For more uplifting quick takes, see here.

12 comments:

Peter and Nancy said...

Never thought I'd hear a mom say, "Fortunately, one of the kids barfed last night . . ." Your serotonin must be LOW. :o)
Nancy

Young Mom said...

A perfect excuse. And incidentally, I reccomend getting a frappachino, the only known cure for low serotonin.

TS said...

You may have pre-seasonal Seasonal Affective Disorder. I get it in late May, when I begin pre-anticipating the shortening of days. The only known cure is alcohol. :-) I did try a massage the other day, which only led to increased sexual tension. (Likely a guy thing.) If you can believe it, the masseuse never heard of the S.A.D...

deanna said...

SAD can be taken care of with a hot bath and coffee with Amaretto or Kalahua in it. But I live in S. Florida so I could be wrong.

deanna said...

kaluhua,

Katherine said...

For that 'why-demanding' accedie, Thomas Aquinas recommends a hot bath, a glass of wine and an early night; and he's a doctor of the church ;)

dylan said...

About the self-published books at the farmer's market: novels? or poetry? or nonfiction? Depending on the genre, it's possibe that I'd be interested!

I think it's semi-hopeful! (How's that for noncommittal?)

In my bailiwick, there's a fellow who leaves a xerox'd handwritten newsletter of sorts in the various coffee shops and bookstores and businesses of the town. It's kind of sad, because people make fun of him, and I don't know who reads the newsletter (besides me!) -- but the guy really needs to discover the internet and start a blog. (This fellow also runs for office periodically, as a longer-than-longshot candidate.)

Hope said...

I started using my light box for SAD in mid September so I don't think it's too soon. I most likely live quite a ways north of you but still.

eaucoin said...

Yeah, sick days are not quite as good as snow days, but they have a certain cache. Instead of looking for shovels, candles and batteries, you're counting buckets and trash-talking. Kids who've never had to line up for the bathroom on a cold morning have never really lived. These are the special moments.

BettyDuffy said...

Managed to get a nap in the afternoon, which improved things considerably, and still fell asleep at ten. Wish I could do more drinking and sugar-eating, but both seem to have a negative effect on my moods in the long run. And baths...you may remember an ancient post in which I documented our progress in a bathroom project we had to start due to a leaky faucet. I'm sorry to report that while the shower is functional, nothing else in the bathroom is, hence the line at our only functioning john.

Dylan, the books for sale were a couple of story collections. And I think that today I'm going to agree with you that the farmer's market idea is sort of hopeful--depending on where you live. Farmer's markets in my town are sort of sad because everybody out here grows tomatoes and lettuce...but not everyone writes books. Maybe a rural market would be improved by more diverse offerings. Blogs are great though, aren't they? I can't think where my low moods would find me if I couldn't complain to the internet. I might be writing newsletters too.

TS, henceforth, your new moniker on this blog is TMI--of course, you're in good company.

Hope, I'm going to have to look into one of those lightboxes. Do they really work?

TS said...

Indeed, had some immediate post-comment regret on that one. :-)

Sally Thomas said...

I know that "fortunately, one of the kids barfed" sensation. Yay! Nobody can make me go anywhere or do anything! Double yay!

I think a lot about the self-publishing thing. It's the kind of thing I'd have sneered at fifteen years ago, when I was going to win the Yale Younger Poets. Now I think, "Well, why not?" The "official" publishing world is narrow and glutted, and I begin to think that I really could not care less if my name ever appears in the Times Literary Review -- I believe this is called "facing reality."

Anyway, I'd say on balance a guy selling his book at farmers' markets is hopeful. It might or might not be good, and people might or might not buy it, but that would be true regardless of how a book got into print, and a dose of localist-free-market might not be a bad thing at all for the future of the printed word.